Your Questions Answered

What is Suboxone? What is Zubsolv?

Suboxone and Zubsolv are brand-names for the medication buprenorphine. These are opioid medications used to treat opioid addiction, either in the privacy of a physician’s office, in drug rehab, or dispensed for take-home use by prescription.

Buprenorphine (Suboxone, Zubsolv) is a safe and effective treatment for individuals addicted to opioids, according to the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. It is different than other opioids in that it is a partial opioid agonist. Because of this property, it may allow for the patient to experience less euphoria and physical dependence. It has a lower potential for misuse, a ceiling on opioid effects, and a relatively mild withdrawal profile.

Appropriate dosage of Suboxone may suppress opioid dependence symptoms, decrease cravings for opioids, reduce illicit use of opioids, block the effects of other opioids, and help patients stay in treatment.

What is Suboxone? What is Zubsolv?

Suboxone and Zubsolv are brand-names for the medication buprenorphine. These are opioid medications used to treat opioid addiction, either in the privacy of a physician’s office, in drug rehab, or dispensed for take-home use by prescription.

Buprenorphine (Suboxone, Zubsolv) is a safe and effective treatment for individuals addicted to opioids, according to the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. It is different than other opioids in that it is a partial opioid agonist. Because of this property, it may allow for the patient to experience less euphoria and physical dependence. It has a lower potential for misuse, a ceiling on opioid effects, and a relatively mild withdrawal profile.

Appropriate dosage of Suboxone may suppress opioid dependence symptoms, decrease cravings for opioids, reduce illicit use of opioids, block the effects of other opioids, and help patients stay in treatment.

Do genetics play a role on addiction?

Your genetics do play a role in addiction, whether the addiction is to alcohol, smoking or drugs. Because addiction has an inherited component, it often runs in families. It can be passed down from parent to child. This does not mean that someone with a family history is doomed to suffer addiction. It means he or she has a higher risk of becoming an addict. There are also environmental factors that play a role. Multiple genes and environmental factors can add together to make a person susceptible or they can cancel each other out.

Do genetics play a role on addiction?

Your genetics do play a role in addiction, whether the addiction is to alcohol, smoking or drugs. Because addiction has an inherited component, it often runs in families. It can be passed down from parent to child. This does not mean that someone with a family history is doomed to suffer addiction. It means he or she has a higher risk of becoming an addict. There are also environmental factors that play a role. Multiple genes and environmental factors can add together to make a person susceptible or they can cancel each other out.

Counseling and Medication

Because opioid dependence is more than just a physical condition, successfully overcoming addiction to opioids requires more than merely dosing the individual with prescription drugs, including buprenorphine (Suboxone, Zubsolv).

Many individuals come to believe that taking a prescription medication will end their addiction. The truth is that, in the case of opioid use disorder, cravings for the substance can occur months or even years after the patient last used the drug. They often arise unexpectedly and with such an intensity that a relapse may occur.

Studies have found that individuals who are being treated with prescription buprenorphine (Suboxone, Zubsolv) who participate in counseling have a much better success rate then those who take buprenorphine alone. Counseling can assist the individual in learning better ways to cope with events, stresses, circumstances and social situations that might otherwise lead them to relapse.

Suboxone helps reduce or eliminate the physical cravings associated with opioid dependence. That the counseling occurs in tandem with Suboxone treatment makes the process easier and more effective by helping to make changes in the behavior and lifestyle so he or she can focus on long-term recovery goals.

Counseling and Medication

Because opioid dependence is more than just a physical condition, successfully overcoming addiction to opioids requires more than merely dosing the individual with prescription drugs, including buprenorphine (Suboxone, Zubsolv).

Many individuals come to believe that taking a prescription medication will end their addiction. The truth is that, in the case of opioid use disorder, cravings for the substance can occur months or even years after the patient last used the drug. They often arise unexpectedly and with such an intensity that a relapse may occur.

Studies have found that individuals who are being treated with prescription buprenorphine (Suboxone, Zubsolv) who participate in counseling have a much better success rate then those who take buprenorphine alone. Counseling can assist the individual in learning better ways to cope with events, stresses, circumstances and social situations that might otherwise lead them to relapse.

Suboxone helps reduce or eliminate the physical cravings associated with opioid dependence. That the counseling occurs in tandem with Suboxone treatment makes the process easier and more effective by helping to make changes in the behavior and lifestyle so he or she can focus on long-term recovery goals.

Signs Your Loved One is Addicted

There are many common warning signs of addiction, from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services:

  • A shift in mood, attitude and motivation
  • A giving up once-favorite pastimes and hobbies
  • Poor performance at school or work and/or being absent
  • Secretive behavior such as lying
  • A sudden, unexplained increase in spending
  • Sudden weight loss or gain
  • Enlarged or pinpoint pupils
  • New friends and new hangouts
  • Strange body odors; trembling hands
  • Unusual changes in sleeping patterns or schedule

In addition, you may notice that your loved one now has angry outbursts and is more volatile or unpredictable. He/she may be inattentive and not follow through on assignments or obligations on time or at all. You may find your loved one making secretive, unexplained phone calls or cash withdrawals, concealing what’s on his/her computer screen, or creating new bank or online accounts. His/her schedule may change frequently, often without your knowledge. Your loved might also be sleeping more or suffering from insomnia, choosing to wear sunglasses often, or wearing long sleeves during hot weather.

It’s also possible that your loved one is not paying the bills, asks to borrow money or is taking or stealing money from you and others. You may notice your partner, friend or relative feeling more melancholy and depressed (these can be psychological symptoms of withdrawal). You may notice prescription medications are missing or you may find syringes lying around. Then there are common physical symptoms when an addict tries to quit a substance; these withdrawal symptoms may include muscle aches, vomiting, sweating, trembling, fever, insomnia and/or diarrhea.

If these signs are confirming your suspicions, you may wonder what you should do now. It’s normal to feel angry, nervous and afraid but you need to calm down before you confront your loved one. No matter how badly you want him or her to get help, you can’t wish sobriety on anyone. They have to want it, so you need to be in control of your emotions to help persuade them to get help. Reach out to a doctor or counselor for proper screening for addiction. You may also decide to enlist the help of an interventionist who can guide you through the process of confronting your loved one about his/her problem; this can be particularly effective in getting the person you love into treatment as soon as possible and on the way to a healthier, sober life.

Sources: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.); Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Signs Your Loved One is Addicted

There are many common warning signs of addiction, from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services:

  • A shift in mood, attitude and motivation
  • A giving up once-favorite pastimes and hobbies
  • Poor performance at school or work and/or being absent
  • Secretive behavior such as lying
  • A sudden, unexplained increase in spending
  • Sudden weight loss or gain
  • Enlarged or pinpoint pupils
  • New friends and new hangouts
  • Strange body odors; trembling hands
  • Unusual changes in sleeping patterns or schedule

In addition, you may notice that your loved one now has angry outbursts and is more volatile or unpredictable. He/she may be inattentive and not follow through on assignments or obligations on time or at all. You may find your loved one making secretive, unexplained phone calls or cash withdrawals, concealing what’s on his/her computer screen, or creating new bank or online accounts. His/her schedule may change frequently, often without your knowledge. Your loved might also be sleeping more or suffering from insomnia, choosing to wear sunglasses often, or wearing long sleeves during hot weather.

It’s also possible that your loved one is not paying the bills, asks to borrow money or is taking or stealing money from you and others. You may notice your partner, friend or relative feeling more melancholy and depressed (these can be psychological symptoms of withdrawal). You may notice prescription medications are missing or you may find syringes lying around. Then there are common physical symptoms when an addict tries to quit a substance; these withdrawal symptoms may include muscle aches, vomiting, sweating, trembling, fever, insomnia and/or diarrhea.

If these signs are confirming your suspicions, you may wonder what you should do now. It’s normal to feel angry, nervous and afraid but you need to calm down before you confront your loved one. No matter how badly you want him or her to get help, you can’t wish sobriety on anyone. They have to want it, so you need to be in control of your emotions to help persuade them to get help. Reach out to a doctor or counselor for proper screening for addiction. You may also decide to enlist the help of an interventionist who can guide you through the process of confronting your loved one about his/her problem; this can be particularly effective in getting the person you love into treatment as soon as possible and on the way to a healthier, sober life.

Sources: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.); Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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FROM OUR PATIENTS

"Six years of my life. That's what heroin took from me. When I..." - J. T.

"Dr. Baird may seem tough at first but that's because she actually cares. Stick with the program. If you do..." - K. C.

"This is the first Suboxone Dr. I have seen that seems to actually care..." - K. P.

Continue Reading

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